MysticSail.com

An epic sailing adventure of surfing, skateboarding, kiteboarding, and exploration aboard the “Natural Mystic”

MysticSail.com header image 2

Life in the Boatyard

January 23rd, 2008 · 7 Comments

Picture a boatyard with weeds sprouting out of the dirt, chickens running from the occaisional cat or dog willing to give chase, and no real concern for pollution.  I have worked in boatyards in the Bay Area, Santa Barbara, San Diego, Key West, and now even Rhode Island; I can assure you that none of our US yards are like this.  I have seen men covered from head to toe in both red and blue bottom paint, while only wearing shorts and a t-shirt.  The other day Kyber was on the bow, wearing his full face respirator and doing a bit of sanding; meanwhile, the hired pros are grinding for hours with only a bandana over the nose, like Jesse James robbing trains in the old west.  That said, they do great work, and it sounds like for a fraction of what this would cost at good old harbor marine.  They have boats ranging in size from small Catalinas to multi-million dollar catamarans, and we have been able to get most anything you would find in most chandleries in the states.

As Ben already showed you we got out with our kites a few days.  Yes, I got my chicken legs super sunburned the first day (the angle of the sun is totally different here to the wind than at home), and I was wearing my fishworks pants (which are the same material as trunks) the second day.  For those of you who get this: I am sure I it made Eric proud.  I don’t plan on trying to revive the kitepants movement.  Basically, the place we kite has one launch site, and it is between rock jetties.  There is coral the whole way across, so you have to launch in the sand that has accumulated on the leeward side of the windward jetty, and edge hard to avoid the coral.  Once you get out, there is about the same amount of downcoast current as leadbetter (at least leds on a good day), and twice the chop.  You have to go with a bigger kite and bigger fins, and the chop and current combo make it difficult to edge hard enough to do much.  There is no surf on this side of the island, plus the coral on the launch would destroy an FCS, so we are sticking to kiteboards.  The wind tends to be fickle, and if you don’t make it back to your launch, you get to face patches of coral and urchins till you get to the highway.  I have witnessed one fellow get to face that outcome.   No one should be too jealous of us just yet . . . .   But the light near the end of this particular tunnel is approaching: we plan to splash the boat tomorrow, and the locals have pointed us toward the better parts of this island chain for our watersports.

Tags: Tybur's blog

7 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Jamie // Jan 23, 2008 at 6:23 pm

    Makes you wonder about all these OSHA regulations here in California…most people have no idea what other countries do to contribute to global pollution. Paradise will soon be a dead reef ….like the sea of cortez…fished out and polluted. I fell sorry for future generations. At, least its cheap to get work done…..about a 1/4 of what Harbor Marine would charge…by some extra RUM! JD

  • 2 Melissa // Jan 24, 2008 at 4:31 pm

    Dear Kyber, Here is a favorite poem from Uncle Brian, sent to you with Love.
    MY BED IS A BOAT
    My bed is a little boat:
    Nurse helps me in when I embark
    She girds me in my sailor’s coat
    And starts me in the dark.

    At night, I go on board and say
    Good night to all my friends on shore:
    I shut my eyes and sail away
    And see and hear no more.

    And sometimes things to bed I take,
    As prudent sailors have to do:
    Perhaps a slice of wedding-cake,
    Perhaps a toy or two.

    All night across the dark we steer;
    But when the day returns at last,
    Safe in my room, beside the pier,
    I find my vessel fast.

  • 3 Melissa // Jan 26, 2008 at 12:56 pm

    Dear Kyber and Crew, I must give credit to Robert Louis Stevenson for the poem , ” My Bed Is My Boat”, apologies to all. Thoughts of your voyage brighten my day and your narratives are awesome. Keep sailing, Melissa

  • 4 billy dorff // Jan 26, 2008 at 2:03 pm

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=luLE5ZdZMJk

    come to eureka on boat, check it!

  • 5 sabork // Jan 27, 2008 at 4:14 pm

    SOUNDS LIKE IT’S TIME TO BUILD THAT HALF-PIPE ON BOARD…..GLAD TO HEAR YOU’RE MAKING THE BEST OF IT WITH A LITTLE WATER TIME. KITED CONTAMINATED SEWER EAST BEACH YESTERDAY…WOKE-UP WITH A SOAR THROAT TODAY….LOTS OF RAIN BUT LOVIN IT. GOOD LUCK WITH THE LAUNCH

  • 6 irish Dave // Jan 21, 2009 at 10:55 am

    heykyber.man u guys are living a dream of millions.hunting for your food taking life one day at a time.As the song goes(Life is an ocean,love is a boat,in troubled waters it keep us afloat.)hope all is good.Tell everyone i said hi from Edel and me.PS tell Dizzy i said get well soon.

  • 7 Larry Handley // Feb 28, 2009 at 2:33 am

    Kyber, Great reading. Will read often. Thinking about going with your Dad to Hawaii on Monday. Keep up the great work. Someone has to sail the seven seas. Gives the rest of us something to dream about.

Leave a Comment